Tuesday, January 09, 2007

The MP3 debate continues

After my post yesterday I saw this feature on Wired putting a case forward for MP3 far more eloquently than me. As an example of how frustrating this is, consider the work Million are doing for Jamiroquai. We would love to sell full length tracks from Jamiroquai.com – remixes, demos, alternate versions etc. But we want to do it is as easy a way as possible, which means no DRM – after all, these tracks are for hardcore fans who are unlikely to send them to friends. Easiest way would be to use a system like Paypal or reverse bill SMS to charge a micropayment and allow fans to download an MP3. But how easy is it for an artiste on a major label to supply their own fans with their own music? Well, the reason it isn’t on Jamiroquai.com yet is an indication! The tracks are all available of course via P2P in variable states of quality, but try to sell them legitimately and you run into a wall of corporate silence and ‘policy’.   

1 comment:

David Rowe said...

I'd love to buy full length tracks in decent quality non DRM format (ie., MP3). I listen to music in a variety of places - my computer, walkman phone, mp3 player when out running, in the living room (through my xbox streaming across a network) and on CD's in my car.

Having files in MP3 format makes this really easy for me to listen to music in all these places with little or no processing to get from one platform to another.

The trouble is, getting files as high quality MP3's in the first place means I'm not looking on iTunes etc. for them in the first place...

I also like having physical CD's and booklets to read, but then again perhaps that's just a sign of age...